Corruption in the child protection industry: retaliation on those who disagree, unveil wrongdoings and those who get their children back in court

PAPA People Assisting Parents Association

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On 14 July 2015, the Supreme Court of B.C. handed down an unprecedented judgment J.P. v. British Columbia (Children and Family Development), 2015 BCSC 1216. This is the first case in Canadian legal history in which child protection workers are found liable for misfeasance in public office, breach of fiduciary duty and breach of the standard of care. Findings therein confirm our views and support the merit of our cause. Continuous litigations between JP and the MCFD are summarized in JP Aftermath. Our commentary on the Plecas Review Part 1: Decision Time was published on 4 January 2016. If you have evidence of misfeasance or abuse of children in foster care, please come forward and contact us.
Our site contains vast amount of information on child protective services (CPS). Please hover your mouse over the navigation icons below to access the most frequently sought information by various categories of browsers.
parents must read
  1. MCFD Tactics
  2. MCFD Surveillance
  3. MCFD found liable for misfeasance
  4. Psychotherapy
  5. Flaws of CFCSA
  6. Absolute Power and Corruption
  7. Myths & Reality
  8. On-line Service Application
Media
  1. MCFD found liable for misfeasance
  2. MCFD Tactics
  3. MCFD Surveillance
  4. MCFD & The First Nation
  5. Unreported Deaths of Albertan Foster Children
  6. Child Removal and Human Organ Harvesting
  7. Empirical and Statistical Data
  8. Child Removal Cases
  9. Video Archives
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most popular
  1. MCFD found liable for misfeasance
  2. MCFD & The First Nation
  3. The Child Protection Industry
  4. Unreported Deaths of Albertan Foster Children
  5. Our Comment on "When Talk Trumped Service"
  6. "The problem with Children’s Aid Societies" by Barbara Kay for National Post
  7. Powerful As God (2011 documentary)
  8. CPS Quotas: How Child Protective Services is Incentivized To Take Children video
  9. Documentary on the Child Protection Industry
  10. "The Child Abuse Laws Which Could Destroy Your Reputation"
  11. 3-part WLKY Target 32 Investigates (Kentucky, U.S.A.):
    1. "CPS Makes Shocking Allegations at 2 Moms Part 1 of 3"
    2. "CPS Does About Face, Accuses Parents Of Abuse Part 2 of 3"
    3. "CPS Makes More Disturbing Allegations Against Parents Part 3 of 3"
  12. "Child Protective System WLKY Louisville Part 1"; and
    "Child Protective System WLKY Louisville Part 2"
  13. Documentary on the Ministry of Children and Family Development Part 1 and Part 2
  14. "The Negative Effects of Foster Care on Removed Children" (Wikipedia)
  15. "Mass CPS corruption Part 2"
  16. "Deconstructing America Part 1" "Deconstructing America Part 2"
  17. "Death of a foster child Dontel Jeffers, Dorchester, Massachusetts, U.S.A. (Part 1)" "(Part 2)" ABC News
  18. U.S. Republican Senator Nancy Schaefer spoke on "child protective service" (CPS) corruption video
  19. "Children's Aid Society workers should be reined in" National Post
  20. Wrongful Removal of Christina Harrison's Baby
  21. Jessica Laboy case
  22. Removal of the 13 Gates Children in Texas, U.S.A.
  23. "Married to the State: How government colonizes the family"
    by Professor Stephen Baskerville (September 2009)

Statistics on the Child Protection Industry

Statistics have been used to support our position at various places of our web site. For the ease of reference, statistics related to the "child protection" industry are summarized below. Please click the purple headings to view details and the blue links to view the context where these statistics are used in our web site.

  1. Age Distribution of Removed Children (2002-2009) (used in Financial Incentives to Special Interests and Burden on Taxpayers)
  2. Age Distribution of Removed Children (2002-2009) and Adopted Children (2001 - 2006) combined (used in Adoption and Child Removal)
  3. Open Child Protection Reports By Duration (1998 - 2008) (used in MCFD Tactics Introduction)
  4. Summary of Critical Injuries and Deaths of B.C. Children and Youth "In Care" of MCFD since 1 June 2007 (used in Impacts on Children, Families and Society)
  5. Children Living with Grandparent(s) with no Parents Present 2006 B.C. Stats (used in Financial Incentives)
  6. Section 35 Presentation Hearings Judicial Decisions between 1999 to 2001: 98% in favour of the Ministry under the Child, Family and Community Service Act (used in Challenges on Human Rights, Natural Justice and Civil Liberty)
  7. Death of Children in Foster Care in North America published by fixcas.com (used as a stand alone page under Empirical Data menu tab)
  8. Children Involved with the Ministry: Fatalities of Children receiving "services" and "in care" published by the Ministry of Children and Family Development from 1996 to 2010 (used in Impacts on Children, Families and Society)
  9. Negative Impacts on Children
    1. Behavioral: 41.2% of children (age 12-17) in care appear in youth court versus 6.4% of general population, Source: Table 1 of Kids, Crime and Care: Youth Justice Experiences and Outcomes Joint Special Report published by B.C. Representative for Children and Youth Office on 23 February 2009 (be mindful that children under age 12 are not chargeable of any criminal offence per Criminal Code in Canada)
    2. Educational: 24.5% of children in care graduate versus 74.4% of general population, Source: Table 5 of Kids, Crime and Care: Youth Justice Experiences and Outcomes Joint Special Report published by B.C. Representative for Children and Youth Office on 23 February 2009
    3. Economical: 88.6% of children in care receive income assistance by the age of 19 versus 29.5% of general population, Source: Table 7 of Kids, Crime and Care: Youth Justice Experiences and Outcomes Joint Special Report published by B.C. Representative for Children and Youth Office on 23 February 2009
    4. Suicidal Tendency: children in care are nearly three times more likely to consider suicide – and nearly six times more likely to have attempted suicide at least once – than youth who have never been in care, Source: Growing Up In B.C. published by B.C. Representative for Children and Youth Office on 18 October 2010
    5. Well Being:
      • Aboriginal children and children in care are less likely to experience success in school.
      • Children in care are more likely to engage in risky behaviour, such as using tobacco, alcohol and drugs.
      • Children in care are more likely to have gone to bed hungry.
      • Youth in care consistently talked about the challenges they face in everyday life, such as creating and maintaining long-term relationships, having no-one to see them graduate, not having adult support or financial means to encourage them to do well in school or apply for post-secondary education.

    Source: Growing Up In B.C. published by B.C. Representative for Children and Youth Office on 18 October 2010 (all the above used in Impacts on Children, Families and Society)

  10. Foster Homes
    1. Foster Homes by Geographic Areas in British Columbia (total 3,255 in 2011)
    2. Increase in Foster Home Monthly Rates (1 October 1991 - 2009)
    3. MCFD foster care rates for different categories of children (2007 - 2009)
    4. MCFD payments to B.C. Foster Parents (fiscal year 2001/2 - 2007/8) (source: Freedom of Information application)
    5. Inter-jurisdiction Foster Home Statistics Comparison (source: indicated per blue link in the table below)
    6. California Foster Care Comparative Statistics (source: Angels Foster Family Network, 4420 Hotel Circle Court, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92108)
    7. U.S. National Foster Care Data and Results of Foster Care Studies (source: Casey Family Programs published on September 2011)

    (a,b,c used in Foster Home; d, f and g not used in this web site; e used in Flaws of CFCSA)

  11. Aboriginal People
    1. Ratio of child removal in British Columbia between Native and non-Native groups in 2001: 10 times higher (used in MCFD & Native Indians)
    2. Child removal in British Columbia between Native and non-Native groups from 2002 -2008 (used in MCFD & Native Indians)

  12. 2006 B.C. household structure statistics with geographic breakdown (used in Financial Incentives to Special Interests and Burden on Taxpayers)
  13. MCFD Budgets (from 2000 to now)
  14. 2011 Census family related data:
    1. 2011 Census private households by families with and without children
    2. 2011 Census families with and without children
    3. 2011 Census age distribution of the Canadian population
  15. Child safety risk statistics comparison between CPS assigned foster homes and parental homes
    Risk Comparison of Child Protective Services (CPS) Run Foster Homes and Parental Homes in the U.S.
    Abuse per 100,000 children
    Type of Abuse CPS
    (a)
    Parents
    (b)
    risk in CPS higher by
    [(a)/(b) x 100%]
    Physical Abuse 160 59 271%
    Sexual Abuse 112 13 862%
    Neglect 410 241 170%
    Medical Neglect 14 12 117%
    Fatalities 6.4 1.5 427%
    Source: National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (1998)
    Other Life Threatening Risk

    Children in foster care are at a greater risk of suicide, the increased risk of suicide is still prevalent after leaving foster care and occurs at a higher rate than the general population. In a small study of twenty-two Texan youths who aged out of the system, 23% had a history of suicide attempts.

    Children in foster care have an overall higher mortality rate than children in the general population. A study conducted in Finland among current and former foster children up to age 24 found a higher mortality rate due to substance abuse, accidents, suicide and illness. The deaths due to illness were attributed to an increased incidence of acute and chronic medical conditions and developmental delays among children in foster care.

    The late Georgia Senator Nancy Schaefer published a report "The Corrupt Business of Child Protective Services" stating:

    "The National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect in 1998 reported that six times as many children died in foster care than in the general public and that once removed to official “safety”, these children are far more likely to suffer abuse, including sexual molestation than in the general population".
    Source: Foster care (comparison on abuse and negligence, poverty and homelessness, academic performance, psychotropic medication abuse can also be found in the aforesaid web page)




[This page was conceptualized on 22 December 2011, published on 22 December 2011, last revised on 2 April 2015.]